the lonliest number

From WWdN: In Exile:

I have a sticker on my car that says, “There is no place like 127.0.0.1” I get to explain it to a lot of people, and I’m usually rewarded with a blank look, followed by a pitying look, followed by parents holding on tightly to their children as they move away slowly at first, then quickly, never turning their backs on me.

I get to explain it to a lot of people, and I’m usually rewarded with a blank look, followed by a pitying look, followed by parents holding on tightly to their children as they move away slowly at first, then quickly, never turning their backs on me.

Such is the life of a geek among normals.

My pal R. Stevens, creator of the always-awesome Diesel Sweeties comic, has a new T-shirt with a different take on the 127.0.0.1 joke that hit a little close to 127.0.0.1 for me: “127.0.0.1 is the loneliest number”

There will be 10 kinds of people in the world: those who get this shirt, and those who don’t.

ROTFLMAO!

The funniest part of that is the final line. If you get it, you pass the test and get to retain your geek card. If not, turn it in at the closest gateway.

Microsoft Believes IBM Masterminded Anti-OOXML Initiative

From Slashdot:

mahuyar writes “Microsoft executives have accused IBM of leading the campaign against their initiative to have Office Open XML approved by the International Organization for Standardization. ‘Nicos Tsilas, senior director of interoperability and IP policy at Microsoft, said that IBM and the likes of the Free Software Foundation have been lobbying governments to mandate the rival OpenDocument Format (ODF) standard to the exclusion of any other format. “They have made this a religious and highly political debate,” Tsilas said. “They are doing this because it is advancing their business model. Over 50 percent of IBM’s revenues come from consulting services.”‘”

They say this like it’s a bad thing. It might be bad for THEM, but overall it’s a good thing. Isn’t this how the standards process is supposed to work? Interested parties get together and make proposals, vote on them, lobby each other to accept certain changes, etc. Microsoft should just drop OOXML. It’s not a standard, because only THEY are intereested in it, and it’ll only ever work for them. They should adopt ODF, and let their products compete on a level playing field. Or is that what they’re afraid of?